LCI News/Presse

Doctoral students from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM), the Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Lung Center (FZB) and the Leibniz Institute of Virology (LIV) met for a three-day meeting on "Molecular Infectious Diseases Epidemiology". The three institutes organized the summer school as part of the Leibniz Center Infection (LCI) Graduate School as a joint event with the Hamburg Leibniz ScienceCampus "Integrative Analysis of Pathogen-induced Compartments" (InterACt). The summer school offered the doctoral students plenty of time for dialogue and networking.

Gruppenfoto LCI Summerschool 2024 Foto BNITM
Group picture LCI Summer School 2024 ©BNITM

The LCI Summer School took place from 15 to 17 May 2024 at Camp Reinsehlen in Schneverdingen with almost 80 PhD students. The program ranged from a keynote lecture, speed talks, a poster session and workshops to a social program including a barbecue evening, a short hike and plenty of time outdoors in good weather.

The event was hosted by Prof Dr Tim Gilberger, Head of the LCI Graduate School and the Cellular Parasitology Department at the BNITM. The exciting keynote lecture on "(Multi-omics) Approaches for bacterial phenotype and infection outcome prediction" was given by Prof Dr Mario Recker from the University Hospital of Tübingen. Other interesting talks provided insights into membrane-active substances of pathogens and the epidemiology of tuberculosis.

Foto LCI Summerschool 2024 Foto BNITM
In a relaxed atmosphere and beautiful weather, the doctoral students had plenty of opportunity to talk and get to know each other. ©BNITM

All PhD students had the opportunity to present their PhD projects in three-minute speed talks. A science speed dating event and a poster session gave them the possibility to discuss their research in more detail. The workshops were interactive: students analyzed data sets and discussed processes of inflammation and immunity.

As every year, prizes were awarded; this year's winners for the best speed talks were

1st prize: Jana Dröge (BNITM)
2nd prize: Liisa Knipp (FZB)
3rd prize: Henriette Ebel (LIV) & Julia Nave (BNITM)

Preisgewinner LCI Summerschool 2024 Foto BNITM
The award ceremony (left to right): Jana Dröge, Liisa Knipp and Henriette Ebel ©BNITM

Luca Genz (LIV) won the poster prize.

The Association of the Friends of the Tropical Institute Hamburg e.V. (VdF) has generously provided financial support for the LCI Summer School 2024.

About the LCI Summer School

The LCI Summer School is an annual event organized by the three partner institutes of the Leibniz Center Infection (LIVFZB und BNITM). It is the curriculum of the structured graduate program of the three institutes and provides a platform for professional exchange, networking and presentation of current research results.

On February 1 and 2, 2024, the LCI Symposium of the Leibniz Center Infection (LCI) took place for the 13th time with top-class international speakers. This time, the unique focus was on the long-term consequences of infections. The event not only reflected the growing awareness of long-term consequences, but also emphasized the global and interdisciplinary research in the North German network of three Leibniz Institutes, the Leibniz Institute of Virology, the Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Lung Center and the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, where the scientific event took place.

International scientists met to share their experiences and findings on the possible long-term consequences of various infectious diseases. In addition to presentations on basic bio-medical and infection research, the "Socio-economic consequences of infection" session attracted particular attention. Discussions in this session broadened the focus on aspects such as the economic consequences and social stigma caused by infections, but also misguided communication and disinformation campaigns that have exacerbated epidemics in the past.

The event underlined the LCI goal of understanding the dynamics of infections globally and developing innovative strategies to deal with the long-term consequences. In addition to outstanding presentations on the effects of viral infections on the cardiovascular and immune systems, the social dimensions of tuberculosis and prenatal origins of respiratory diseases, the personal perspective of Dr. Zolelwa Sifumba, a former tuberculosis patient and activist, also contributed an impressive perspective. A total of 127 participants took part in this groundbreaking symposium, which not only reflected the diversity of research at the LCI, but also made a significant contribution to the comprehensive understanding and development of effective measures in dealing with infectious diseases worldwide.

The LCI press release with program and further details you will finde here.

This year's Summerschool of the Leibniz Center Infection on the topic "Perspectives in Structure and Systems Biology in Infection" will take place from June 26-28 in Fintel and offers a great opportunity for exchange and networking for the PhD students of the structured graduate program of the three institutes Leibniz Institute of Virology, Research Center Borstel and Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine.

The Summerschool 2023 is hosted and led by the two department heads of the Leibniz Institute of Virology, Professor Kay Grünewald and Professor Maya Topf. Kay Grünewald is a recognized expert in the field of structural cell biology of viruses, while Maya Topf is an expert in integrative virology in infection research. The combination of their expertise and experience will provide participants with valuable insights into the latest developments in the field.

The three-day event will include lectures, workshops and poster sessions presenting recent research findings and innovative approaches in structural and systems biology in infections. In addition, PhD students will have the opportunity to present their own PhD projects and benefit from the insights of other participants.

About the LCI Summerschool:

The LCI-Summerschool is an annual event organized by the three partner institutes of the Leibniz-Center-Infection (LIV, FZB and BNITM). It is the curriculum of the structured graduate program of the three institutes and offers a platform for professional exchange, networking and the presentation of current research findings.

Apply now:

The LCI invites applications for three doctoral positions. Graduates will work on cooperative projects from two LCI institutes in joint supervision.

More information available HERE (job offer).

Application process completed

At this year's LCI symposium "Compartments in Infection", the latest scientific findings on the role of niches in the body in infectious diseases were presented and discussed. The expertise of the three host institutes, the BNITM, the FZB and the LIV, was utilized and both parasitic, bacterial and viral infectious agents were addressed.

Over 150 participants gathered at the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine on January 26-27, 2023 to learn about current developments in infectious disease research. In the four sessions Membrane modulations in infection, Non-membranous compartments in infection, Cytoskeletal processes in infection and Role of lysosome & phagosome in infection, a total of 17 renowned scientists presented current developments from their research. Each session was introduced with a keynote lecture:

Dr. Tobias Spielmann, head of the research group "Malaria Cell Biology" at the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM) reported on the critical function of the membrane surrounding the malaria parasite in the host cell, because "This membrane is the interface between the parasite and the host cell, through which the parasite transports proteins or gains nutrients. What's interesting to us is that drugs can also enter the parasite through this interface. This makes the pathogen vulnerable - an important finding for drug development," Spielmann explains.

Prof. Simon Alberti of the Technical University of Dresden spoke about biomolecular subunits at the interface between cellular stress, disease and aging.

Dr. Walter Mothes of Yale University, New Haven (USA), spoke on imaging techniques for spatial and temporal resolution of retrovirus and SARS-CoV-2 synthesis.

Dr. Maximilian Gutierrez of the Francis Crick Institute London (UK) explained how the host cell environment affects antibiotic efficacy in tuberculosis.

The LCI Symposium is organized annually by the Leibniz Center Infection, which was founded by the three Leibniz Institutes Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Lung Center and the Leibniz Institute of Virology.

Gruppenfoto LCI-Summer School 2022

Synopsis:

For the first time since the beginning of the corona pandemic, the Summer School of the Leibniz Center Infection (LCI) took place again in presence. On the topic of Perspectives in Infection and Inflammation, PhD students from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM), the Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Lung Center (FZB) and the Leibniz Institute of Virology (LIV) came together for a two and a half day meeting to exchange ideas on current topics in infection biology.

 

Zum ersten Mal seit Beginn der Coronapandemie hat die Summer School des Leibniz Center Infection (LCI) wieder in Präsenz stattgefunden. Zum Thema Perspectives in Infection and Inflammation kamen die Promovierenden des Bernhard-Nocht-Instituts für Tropenmedizin (BNITM), des Forschungszentrums Borstel, Leibniz Lungenzentrum (FZB) und des Leibniz-Instituts für Virologie (LIV) für ein zweieinhalbtägiges Meeting zusammen, um sich über die aktuellen Themen der Infektionsbiologie auszutauschen.

Das Treffen findet jährlich als gemeinsame Veranstaltung aller drei Institute im Rahmen der LCI Graduate School statt. Ziel ist es,  die Vernetzung und den Austausch der unterschiedlichen Themenschwerpunkte zwischen den Promovierenden zu fördern und den Horizont in der Infektiologie zu erweitern. Das abwechslungsreiche Programm vom 2. bis 5. Mai in Plön umfasste in diesem Jahr unter anderem wissenschaftliche Vorträge, Posterpräsentationen, Speed Talks und einen Workshop. Am Abend fand zudem ein Barbecue für den lockeren Austausch zwischen den Promovierenden und den Vortragenden statt.

Rund 110 Teilnehmende nutzten die Summer School für einen lebhaften Austausch. Die hervorragend aufgearbeiteten Poster und Science Slam-ähnliche Kurzvorträge boten viele Diskussionsgrundlagen über die jeweiligen Forschungsarbeiten. Zudem präsentierten erfahrene Forschende der drei LCI-Institute in Vorträgen ihre Forschung.

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Synopsis:

A research team from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM), EMBL Grenoble and the HPI/UHH Department "Structural Cell Biology of Viruses" at the CSSB have studied nine structures of an essential Lassa virus protein in different functional states. The protein is necessary for virus replication and thus provides excellent targets for antiviral agents. The results have now been published in the journal Nature Communications.

Hamburg/Grenoble. Ein Forschungsteam des Bernhard-Nocht-Instituts für Tropenmedizin (BNITM), des EMBL Grenoble sowie der HPI/UHH-Abteilung „Strukturelle Zellbiologie der Viren“ am  CSSB haben neun Strukturen eines essentiellen Lassavirus-Proteins in verschiedenen funktionellen Zuständen untersucht. Das Protein ist für die Virusvermehrung notwendig und bietet so hervorragende Angriffspunkte für antivirale Wirkstoffe. Die Ergebnisse sind jetzt in der Fachzeitschrift Nature Communications veröffentlicht worden.

Das Lassavirus kommt in westafrikanischen Ländern vor und wird durch kontaminierte Lebensmittel oder Haushaltsgegenstände von Mastomys-Mäusen, den natürlichen Wirten des Virus, auf den Menschen übertragen. Obwohl viele Infektionen des Menschen mit dem Lassavirus asymptomatisch verlaufen, entwickelt etwa einer von fünf Patienten eine schwere hämorrhagische Fiebererkrankung, die lebenswichtige Organe wie Leber, Milz und Nieren beeinträchtigen kann. Die Weltgesundheitsorganisation stuft Lassafieber als erhebliche Bedrohung der Weltgesundheit ein. Die Infektionskrankheit birgt ein hohes Epidemiepotenzial; ohne Impfungen oder verlässlich wirksame Medikamente.

„Obwohl Forschungsgruppen weltweit an einem Impfstoff arbeiten, wird ein wirksames antivirales Medikament dringend benötigt, um die Zahl der schweren und tödlichen Fälle zu verringern“, erklärt Dr. Maria Rosenthal, BMBF-Nachwuchsgruppenleiterin des BNITM. Hier könne die Strukturbiologie helfen

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2021 06 03 lci summerschool
Teilnehmende der digitalen LCI Summer School

Synopsis:

At the first digital Summer School of the Leibniz Center Infection on the topic "Molecular biology of pathogens", PhD students from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM), the Research Center Borstel - Leibniz Lung Center (FZB) and the Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology (HPI) came together for a two-day digital meeting to exchange ideas on current topics in infection biology.

From June 3-4, 2021, LCI PhD students learned about the research priorities of the various institutes and the research of their colleagues. In "Speed Talks", 22 PhD students presented their research to each other in lively, well-prepared short talks, of which the three best talks were awarded prizes at the end of the event: The first place went to Pit Engling from the FZB, the second place to Konstantin von Stromberg from the HPI and the third place to Cari Lehmann from the BNITM.

In addition, experienced scientists from the respective institutes presented their research in lectures. Volker Heussler from the Institute of Cell Biology at the University of Bern was recruited for the keynote lecture, reporting on molecular approaches to malaria.

Bei der ersten digitalen Summer School des Leibniz Center Infection zum Thema „Molecular biology of pathogens“  kamen die Promovierenden vom Bernhard-Nocht-Institut für Tropenmedizin (BNITM), dem Forschungszentrum Borstel – Leibniz Lungenzentrum (FZB) und dem Leibniz-Institut für Experimentelle Virologie (HPI) für ein zweitägiges digitales Meeting zusammen, um sich über die aktuellen Themen der Infektionsbiologie auszutauschen.

Vom 3. bis 4. Juni 2021 lernten die Promovierenden des LCI die Forschungsschwerpunkte der verschiedenen Institute sowie die Forschung ihrer Kolleginnen und Kollegen kennen. In „Speed Talks“ stellten 22 Doktorandinnen und Doktoranden sich in lebhaften, gut aufgearbeiteten Kurzvorträgen gegenseitig ihre Forschungsarbeiten vor, von denen am Ende der Veranstaltung die drei besten Talks prämiert worden sind: Der erste Platz ging dabei an Pit Engling vom FZB, Platz zwei an Konstantin von Stromberg vom HPI und Platz drei an Cari Lehmann vom BNITM.

Außerdem präsentierten erfahrene Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler der jeweiligen Institute in Vorträgen ihre Forschung. Für den Keynote-Vortrag konnte Volker Heussler vom Institut für Zellbiologie an der Universität Bern gewonnen werden, der über molekulare Ansätze zur Malaria berichtete.

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Jetzt bewerben:

Das LCI sucht insgesamt drei Doktorandinnen/Doktoranden für kooperative LCI-Projekte von jeweils zwei LCI-Instituten.

Mehr Informationen dazu gibt es HIER (Stellenausschreibung).

Stellenbeschreibung HPI

Stellenbeschreibung FZB

Stellenbeschreibung BNITM

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Synopsis:

The Leibniz Center Infection (LCI) contributes to the control of the current pandemic spread of the new corona virus SARS-CoV-2 as well as of the associated serious lung disease COVID-19. In order to achieve this, the LCI is funded by the Federal Ministry of Health (BMG).

In close cooperation, the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM), the Research Center Borstel, Leibniz Lung Center (FZB) and the Heinrich Pette Institute, Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology (HPI) have identified research fields in which they can make competent, professional contributions: In addition to joint efforts to characterize the SARS-CoV-2 virus more precisely and thus better understand its spread and properties, complementary infrastructures are to be developed at all three institutes.

 

Hamburg. Das Leibniz Center Infection (LCI) leistet einen Beitrag zur Eindämmung der aktuellen pandemischen Ausbreitung des neuen Corona-Virus SARS-CoV-2 und der Kontrolle der damit verbundenen ernst zu nehmenden Lungenerkrankung COVID-19. Dafür wird das LCI vom Bundesministerium für Gesundheit (BMG) gefördert.

In enger Absprache haben das Bernhard-Nocht-Institut für Tropenmedizin (BNITM), das Forschungszentrum Borstel, Leibniz-Lungenzentrum (FZB) und das Heinrich-Pette-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Experimentelle Virologie (HPI) Forschungsfelder identifiziert, auf denen sie kompetente, fachliche Beiträge leisten können: Neben gemeinsamen Anstrengungen das Virus SARS-CoV-2 genauer zu charakterisieren und so dessen Ausbreitung und Eigenschaften besser zu verstehen, sollen an allen drei Instituten zueinander komplementäre Infrastrukturen ausgebaut werden.

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